Wednesday, September 17, 2014

The Answer to Book Sales

MCS BLOG 14Philosopher Alasdair Macintyre said, “In the age of globalization, cultures are not converging. They seem to be growing farther apart.”
This means when it comes to products, ideas, point of views, and what to read, the world is constantly changing in every city, town, and neighborhood. Each area develops its own culture and becomes unique as compared to other areas.

What Macintyre had really defined is, “Target Marketing.”

Authors write for specific age groups and gender, but often think of those potential readers as general people that use the same basic words, have the same fears of snakes and spiders, happy when there’s enough money to pay the bills, angry or sad when a child is harmed in their city, proud of their accomplishments, and think of time as past, present, and future.

People have similarities, but the culture in each city is extremely different.

Did you know that plays in Germany are three times more likely to have a tragic or unhappy ending than plays in the United States? (Source: Human Universals by Donald E. Brown.)

50% of Indian cultures would marry without love, but only 2% of Japanese cultures would marry someone they didn’t love.

35% of Americans are constantly nervous that they will say the wrong thing, while 65% of Japanese say that are constantly afraid of saying something wrong.

In a London coffee shop, customers rarely shake hands, or hug someone else during a visit. In a Paris coffee shop, a group of customers shake hands and hug 110 times. In a Puerto Rico coffee shop, customers will shake hands and hug 180 times. (Source: University of Florida Research.)

If you accidently bump into a man in the northern part of the United States, there’s a better chance that the man won’t react as compared to the southern part of the United States where the man would probably respond with anger.

The point is that it’s possible for you to sell millions of books if you know the difference between cities in Florida compared to cities in Iowa.

If your book has two main characters that put love above anything and will go out of their way to say the right things to others, then your books would sell best in the following cities:
~ Hilo, Hawaii
~ Gardena, California
~ Rye, New York
~ Dublin, Ohio
~ Beaverton, Oregon

If your book has a dramatic, sad ending, then it would sell best in these cities:
~ Ottawa, Ohio
~ Ferdinand, Indiana
~ Breese, Illinois
~ Melrose, Minnesota
~ Kiel, Wisconsin

Keep in mind that successful businesses use this kind of target thinking when selling products. It’s more important to think of marketing in terms of finding the right culture, rather than a general group of readers to target.

“When an author focuses their marketing plan on culture it builds trust with readers, which increases book sales.” ~ Ron Knight

Which city should you market books? AMP has the answer! www.AuthorsMarketingPro.com
Free marketing tips! Join the 3,900 writers that follow UP Authors!
https://www.facebook.com/upauthors?ref_type=bookmark

Need more tips and advice? Sign up for the UP Authors Newsletter! www.upauthors.com